Search Results for Category: Editorial

There’s a Guerrilla Movement to Protect Data

This probably isn’t how you envisioned a guerrilla movement … A snapshot from the data rescue workshop, “Protecting Climate Data in Times of Political Turmoil,” held at UCLA on Jan. 20. (Photo: Jennifer Pierre) On the United States’ Inauguration Day, a group of students, researchers and librarians gathered in a nondescript building on the north […]

Categories: Big Data, Editorial

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Crowdsourcing Raises Host of Methodological and Ethical Questions

Crowdsourcing offers researchers ready access to large numbers of participants, while enabling the processing of huge, unique datasets. However, the power of crowdsourcing raises several issues, including whether or not what initially emerged as a business practice can be transformed into a sound research method. Isabell Stamm and Lina Eklund argue that the complexities of managing large numbers of people mean crowdsourcing reduces participants to one faceless crowd. Applied to research, this is inherently problematic as it contradicts the basic idea that we control who participates in our studies. This not only challenges scientific rules of representativeness but also leaves methodological designs vulnerable to researchers’ implicit assumptions about the crowd.

Categories: Big Data, Editorial

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You CAN Learn to Program on the Job

I’d graduated from university with a degree I loved but the prospect of finding a stimulating job, let alone a career, was slim. I wasn’t sure where my life was leading. I was stuck. This podcast on design thinking talks about two distinct challenges in everyday life. Dave Evans, who teaches Designing Your Life at […]

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Should You Donate Your Data When You Die?

[Ed. – While this article deals specifically with medical data, that’s not the only type of data that can outlive us. Should other data we accumulate as individuals also be donated to research?] *** Most people are aware they can donate their organs when they die. Doing so is very important: Each deceased donor can […]

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Machines Can Save Us from the Mistakes of the Crowd

The classic example of ‘crowd wisdom’ dates back to 1906 when Sir Francis Galton observed a contest in which attendees were asked to guess the weight of an ox at a country fair in England. In what many consider to be the first experiment on crowd wisdom, the average of the 800 guesses was within […]

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Future Perfect: Seven Data Types We’d Like to See

While there is more data available at our fingertips today than ever before, the future promises to bring even more information into our reach. But what kind of data will it be? And what new doors will it open? As part of our Love Your Data Week 2017 celebration, SAGE Publishing asked a few of our journal editors and textbook authors about what data […]

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Five Important Lessons We Can Learn from Hans Rosling

I first came across Hans Rosling’s work while I was trying to make mathematics students fall in love with statistics. His TED talks are inspirational since they present data in new and dynamic ways, but not just that, they’re also educational and eye-opening. Rosling decided early on that a better way to change the world, […]

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The ‘Edutainer’ of Data: Hans Rosling, 1948-2017

Although he had an important career as a research epidemiologist and an academic, Hans Rosling’s global fame rested on two pillars: stats and hope.  Starting with a TED talk a little over a decade ago, Rosling used his insight, command of statistics, wit and a few props like bayonets and toilet tissue tubes, to explain […]

Categories: Editorial, Quantitative

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When We Talk of Data We’re Really Talking about People, Which Means …

Imagine, if you can, a period long before today’s internet-based connectivity. Imagine that, in that distant time, the populations of every country were offered a new plan. The plan would involve linking up every space of social interaction, most sites of work, a large proportion of private moments of reflection, and a significant proportion of […]

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