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Research ethics

For all those interested in or faced with ethical issues in their use of research methods

Members: 174
Latest Activity: Mar 10

A group for all those interested in or faced with ethical issues in their use of research methods.

Discussion Forum

Letter of approval

Started by Karen McPhail-Bell Mar 12, 2012.

Lack of informed consent 7 Replies

Started by Alexandra Cuncev. Last reply by Dr. Christine Glover-Walton Aug 27, 2011.

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Comment by Janet Salmons on March 10, 2014 at 13:01

Social media research ethics When designing a study-- or reading a published article-- how do you decide what is ethical practice for collecting data online? What ethics codes or guidelines do you trust? What questions persist? Discuss the report posted here http://bit.ly/1kvhDAH and your ideas in a #NSMNSS Tweetchat Tuesday March 3 @ 7 PM London/3PM NYC. Just log into Twitter and look for #NSMNSS. 

Comment by Larisa Kosygina on November 1, 2012 at 5:42

Hi,  could you advise me on literature to develop discussion in my article which addresses issue of ethics in social research practice.  I received feedback from two reviewers to the first variant of the article. While one of them consideres that my text is  focused on ethics in research practice, other indicates that it is focused rather on methodological issues than on ethical. That difference in opinion makes me think on methodology-ethic nexus in the context of sociological research. What is methodological issue and what is ethical one? How are they related to each other? In particular, can they be separated in a way that we can say that this particular issue is purely methodological and there is nothing ethical in it to be discussed?  I would be very grateful if you can advice me texts written by others which address these questions. The references to the articles in journals or open electronic resourses would be appreciated, since living in Russia I do not have access to the printed english language books :(  Many thanks in advance

Comment by Dr. Fibian Lukalo on October 19, 2012 at 22:20

Research ethics as a process of 'de-colonizing methodologies?

Comment by Emma Smith on August 20, 2012 at 14:46

Hi

Can anyone here recommend any good texts on ethical issues in researching topics of a sensitive nature? Any current texts would be particularly welcomed. Thanks!

Comment by Sarah Fletcher on August 27, 2011 at 11:32

Many, many thanks, Bernard, for your generous gift of your time and wisdom,

 

Sarah

Comment by Dr. Christine Glover-Walton on August 27, 2011 at 3:10

 

 

Comment by bernard smith on August 26, 2011 at 21:23

I

f you were one of the subjects of research that involved live human subjects , here in the USA , you must fully consent to be researched and you will have the option of rescinding your authorization at any point in the research, but if you are the subject then I am in the dark about how you can also "assist" in the research unless this is an auto-ethnographic study. And if you are "assisting" then it is not clear that assisting implies the role of lead researcher. But all this says that I am unfamiliar with British research (I lived in Britain and completed some post grad research many years ago ) or with the role of research mentors or tutors. My ignorance.  

regarding the use of video in a class. A good question. I have some concern about researchers using video in a classroom with K-12 students. I have less of a problem with the use of video when adults are involved (I am not sure that K-12 students can give the kind of consent I think might be necessary), but I guess I slightly less concerned if the person using the video "owns" the classroom  and the subjects are adults and are there in the classroom voluntarily and each has given explicit permission for the recording. More ambiguous and problematic might be where a recording was being taken say, for a publicly available webinar , where all participants volunteered to be present and the recording was used by the researchers because they could access it and it was in the public domain...I think my IRB would still require authorization but I don't know that every institution would require this here in the USA and I have no idea what the rules of engagement are in the UK or in other countries.

As to the fairness or otherwise of the policies and practices of your university , that I cannot speak to. Nor can I speak to the decisions that were made about your complaint. Sounds like you were treated poorly. Perhaps you should write up your story for possible publication in a journal like the Chronicle of Higher Education or the Times Higher Education,     

Comment by Sarah Fletcher on August 26, 2011 at 21:01

Looking forward to continuing discussion tomorrow (it's getting late here!) - thank you very much for responding to my posting,

 

Best regards,

 

Sarah

Comment by Sarah Fletcher on August 26, 2011 at 20:47

1. Unwillingly and unknowingly - Yes.

2. I assisted the teacher and her students to undertake research in one school - she claimed that she was the research mentor for her students and that they led the research (no - they didn't). In the other school I assisted a group of teachers to undertake their research and I was also the university tutor i.e. I had different, complementary roles. The teacher who gained his PhD at that school claimed that he undertook both these roles (No - not so) and that I had never been a research mentor for him in the past (Yes, I had). Thus both teachers were effectively impersonating me and taking credit for the successful outcomes of my research mentoring - in the first school the students learnt to undertake research (though they did not 'lead' it) and in the second school this deputy head did not even turn up for most of the sessions let alone tutor teacher researchers nor provide personal/professional support.

3. No - I was not consulted at any point. 

4. Yes - the model of research mentoring they cite is evidentially my concept & I can prove it. (In the same vein, photo images are lifted from my website).

5. Yes.

6. Yes (please see my response to your second question).

7. Yes - the video footage was taken out of context and commented on.

 

My questions to you...

 

1. What do you consider 'fair use' in educational research?

2. What do you understand to be the differences between research tutoring and research mentoring?

3. When might you sanction use of video that has not been authorised by the subject? (if ever)

4. Do you think it is reasonable that one can only present one's evidence at a Hearing following the award of a PhD to another student, if one is a student at the same university?

5. Having received a Letter of Completion, having contacted the supervisor separately and had no response, having contacted the students and been told by one that her supervisor agreed to the use of video of me without consent and by the other that I have never worked with him - what would you do next?

 

Thank you VERY much for such stimulating questions, Bernard - so helpful!

 

Best regards,

 

Sarah

Comment by bernard smith on August 26, 2011 at 20:03

I am sure I appear pretty dense but here goes - I have seven questions

1. Were you part of a sample of people who were the subject of the research?

2. Were you someone whose task it was to help novice researchers prepare or submit their research? (ie not the subject of the research itself)

3. If you or your work was the subject of the research (see 1) were you asked to sign consent/authorization forms and did you have the right to refuse at any and at every point to withhold or rescind your authorization? 

4. Are you claiming that the authorship of intellectual property (ideas etc) which you claim to own was in fact presented by these researchers as their property? 

5. Are you claiming that the researchers are making use of your intellectual property in ways that goes beyond what is considered fair use?.

6. Are you claiming that the researchers in question have cast your methods or ideas or work (whether obtained through (1) or (2) in ways that you disagree with

7. Are you claiming that the researchers cast your ideas or methods or work in ways that question your abilities or competency?

 

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