Search Results for Tag: Statistics

Tips with Diana: Data and Statistics 101

The fundamental difference between data and statistics (because who knew!) The basics Before I started working on SAGE Stats, the idea of working with a large data set was quite intimidating. Shout out to the USDA’s Food Access Research Atlas! In the two years since, working regularly with our platform has really opened my eyes to how empowering […]

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Paradoxes of Probability and Other Statistical Strangeness

Statistics is a useful tool for understanding the patterns in the world around us. But our intuition often lets us down when it comes to interpreting those patterns. In this series we look at some of the common mistakes we make and how to avoid them when thinking about statistics, probability and risk. You don’t […]

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Avoiding The 7 Deadly Sins of Statistical Misinterpretation

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Statistics is a useful tool for understanding the patterns in the world around us. But our intuition often lets us down when it comes to interpreting those patterns. In this series we look at some of the common mistakes we make and how […]

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The ‘Edutainer’ of Data: Hans Rosling, 1948-2017

Although he had an important career as a research epidemiologist and an academic, Hans Rosling’s global fame rested on two pillars: stats and hope.  Starting with a TED talk a little over a decade ago, Rosling used his insight, command of statistics, wit and a few props like bayonets and toilet tissue tubes, to explain […]

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Archived Webinar: Tips for Overcoming Statistics Anxiety

On November 16, bestselling author Neil J. Salkind  discuss strategies that you can implement to reduce statistics anxiety in your students. Using his more than 30 years of teaching experience, Salkind cover some of the topics that students struggle with most, including correlation, understanding hypotheses, and significance (including z-scores and t-tests). Salkind taught for 35 years […]

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Mind the Confidence Interval!

“Most patients using the new analgesia reported significantly reduced pain.” Such research findings sound exciting because the word significant suggests important and large. But researchers often use the word with a narrow statistical meaning that has nothing to do with importance. Consider this statement – a change is statistically significant if we are unlikely to […]

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A Primer on p Hacking

  There is a replicability crisis in science – unidentified “false positives” are pervading even our top research journals. A false positive is a claim that an effect exists when in actuality it doesn’t. No one knows what proportion of published papers contain such incorrect or overstated results, but there are signs that the proportion […]

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Free Chapter From Andy Field’s New Statistics Book

Will Zach find Alice, the missing love of his life, and save the world? Will he survive the bridge of death? Can he escape the zombie horde? Statistically speaking the odds don’t look good … Award-winning teacher and bestselling author Andy Field hasn’t just broken the traditional textbook mold with his new, stunningly illustrated introduction […]

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Statistical Association Takes on Use, Abuse of P-values

Even as it insists it’s not really saying anything new, the American Statistical Association Board of Directors has laid down a marker in the debate over what constitutes “statistical significance.” After months of discussion with a blue-chip panel of experts, the association has laid down six principles about what constitutes good practice when dealing with […]

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Focusing on Average Treatment Impacts May Underestimate Program Impacts

This post is based on the article “Reconsidering findings of “no effects” in randomized control trials: Modeling differences in treatment impacts” by Brad Chaney. The article appears online at the American Journal of Evaluation. When impacts vary from one subgroup to another, then focusing on average treatment effects (ATEs) may underestimate the impacts, according to […]

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