Missing Data Using Stata

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Date/Time
Date(s) - 02/23/2016 - 02/24/2016
All Day

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Start Date: 2/23/2016

End Date: 2/24/2016

Location:

Hotel Birger Jarl Conference

Tulegatan 8

Stockholm, Sweden

Website: http://statisticalhorizons.com/seminars/public-seminars/sweden-md

Contact: 610-642-1941

Taught by Paul Allison, Ph.D.

If you’re using conventional methods for handling missing data, you may be missing out. Conventional methods for missing data, like listwise deletion or regression imputation, are prone to three serious problems:

  • Inefficient use of the available information, leading to low power and Type II errors.
  • Biased estimates of standard errors, leading to incorrect p-values.
  • Biased parameter estimates, due to failure to adjust for selectivity in missing data.

More accurate and reliable results can be obtained with maximum likelihood or multiple imputation.

These new methods for handling missing data have been around for at least a decade, but have only become practical in the last few years with the introduction of widely available and user friendly software. Maximum likelihood and multiple imputation have very similar statistical properties. If the assumptions are met, they are approximately unbiased and efficient–that is, they have minimum sampling variance.

What’s remarkable is that these newer methods depend on less demanding assumptions than those required for conventional methods for handling missing data. Maximum likelihood is available for linear models, logistic regression and Cox regression. Multiple imputation can be used for virtually any statistical problem.

This course will cover the theory and practice of both maximum likelihood and multiple imputation using Stata. It will focus on the mi command for multiple imputation and the sem command for maximum likelihood.

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