RESEARCH METHODS

Home Forums Methodspace discussion RESEARCH METHODS

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #2043

    What exactly the difference between ” quantitative vs qualitative” research methods…

    #2057

    Uh, a lot of books have been written on that topic. In short, my take is that quantitative methods produce “figures” like a correlation coefficient or estimated marginal effect that forms the basis for causal inference. Qualitative methods relies on a diverse body of evidence (interview statements, primary sources, images, etc.) that is used for causal inference. A much more complex treatment of qualitative vs. quantitative can be found in Creswell, John W. and Vicki L. Plano Clark (2011): Designing and Conducting Mixed Methods Research. Los Angeles: SAGE Publications. (even if you are not primarily interested into mixed-methods research).

    #2056

    HMM THANK U…QUANTITATIVE APPEARS TO BE MORE OBJECTIVE THAN QUALITATIVE?…QUALITATIVE IS MORE ON A INTERACTIVE BASIS?…DO THEY (METHODS) ?SUPPORT EACH OTHER……I WILL TRY TO OBTAIN THE BOOK OR READ ON THE NET….GOD BLESS…

    #2055

    It all depends on whom you ask or what you read. Don’t expect a clear answer to what “qualitative” and “quantitative” mean. The best thing you can hope for is to understand why some people take one perspective or the other in the qualitative-quantitative debate. You could also read

    Prakash, Deepa and Audie Klotz (2007): Should We Discard the “Qualitative” Versus “Quantitative” Distinction? International Studies Review 9 (4): 753-770.

    #2054

    THANK U FOR YOUR TIME….MUCH APPRECIATED….

    #2053
    Dr Mike Lambert
    Participant

    Sepherina, I feel it is more useful to talk about quantitative/qualitative data, rather than quantitative/qualitative methods.  This is because any one method can produce both kinds of data – it depends on the nature of the data and how they are analysed. 

     

    Here is a very basic explanation:

     

    ‘Methods produce two kinds of data:

    • Quantitative: This kind is usually numerical, for instance: How many respondents disagreed with the statement: Mathematics is the most important subject in the curriculum?  Answer: 15.
    • Qualitative: These data consist of words (or visual images), for instance:
    • A respondent wrote: ‘I find teaching mixedability classes very difficult’.
    • A participant said: “The lesson went largely to plan”.
    • Your record of an observation: ‘Teacher praised child for correct answer’ (but if you were counting the number of times this happened, you would then have quantitative data).

     

    Quantitative data are usually associated with a positive paradigm; qualitative data with an interpretivist paradigm.  Quantitative data can be collected from many respondents; qualitative data usually come from fewer people but allow more indepth consideration of ideas.‘

     

    This is taken from A Beginner’s Guide to Doing Your Education Research Project.  See http://bit.ly/IrLHvD and on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/QsLY2Q

     

    Good luck with your research!

     

    #2052

    Dr. mike thank u very much..much clearer…..u can be a teacher/instructor…

     

     

    #2051

    We cannot open this debate here, but I oppose tying qualitative data to a particular paradigm/philosophy of science. Qualitative data is non-comparable data (images, interview statements etc.) as opposed to quantitative data that is comparable (Collier, David, Henry E. Brady and Jason Seawright (2004): Sources of Leverage in Causal Inference: Toward an Alternative View of Methodology. Brady, Henry E. and David Collier (eds.): Rethinking Social Inquiry. Diverse Tools, Shared Standards. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield: 229-266). Qualitative data is just data, an observation. How you analyze your qualitative data and on the basis of what paradigm is a separate matter. 

    #2050
    Dr Mike Lambert
    Participant

    These are sophisticated and interesting ideas, Ingo, and few would disagree.  However, it is still true to say that ‘quantitative data are usually associated with a positive paradigm; qualitative data with an interpretivist paradigm’.  Yes?

    #2049

    comprendo…senor…i understand,,,,wow!!

    #2048

    On the quantitative data and positive paradigm, I agree, on qualitative data and interpretivism, I do not know. I think we have some differences between US and Europe (and other continents), but what is needed is a throrough review of the literature.

    #2047

    HMM HMM

    #2046
    David Morgan
    Participant

    I agree with Mike that quantitative data and qualitative data are often “associated” with particular paradigms, but I think this is mostly a product of how we have been trained to discuss the big issues in Methodology, rather than how we actually do research in the field..

       In actual practice, I agree with with I think is Ingo’s position — that paradigm issues do not necessarily need to exercise a major influence on how we collect and analyze data.

    ==>David

    #2045

    Dear Mr. Ingo

    Please comment: I am conducting a research on impact of donor funded projects by visiting the beneficiaries and filling questinnairs. Main questions are the 1. Number of employment generated 2. Increase in production. Both are in terms of numbers and quantity. Will this be a quantitative method? Regards

    #2044
    Stephen Gorard
    Participant

    The whole thing is a red herring. Don’t bother to label your research as either (or as mixed – see attached). It makes no difference. There are no different techniques, paradigms or reality involved. No research is objective, as such. It just has to be reasoned. All research involves numbers (even if just ‘few’, ‘some’ etc.). It does not affect the design, or the analysis. If you want a correlation coefficient calculate and interpret it. Calling it a quantiative correlation coefficient does not alter it, it wastes words, and can confuse the unwary. Avoid the q words except as derision.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.