Chareen Snelson

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  • #2223
    Chareen Snelson
    Participant

    Thanks for the post Anna. I just finished reading Netnography over the summer. I am using the book and methodology discussed within to help guide a study of video blogs on YouTube that I have been working on. It’s great to hear that a new edition is coming out. Do you want feedback posted here or elsewhere?

    #2347
    Chareen Snelson
    Participant

    Online is fabulous. Thanks for considering that. There is no way for me to attend otherwise.

    #2352
    Chareen Snelson
    Participant

    Katie, does access to this video require a paid subscription? I cannot seem to gain access to it from here. I did just get a copy of the Netnography book though. 

    #2364
    Chareen Snelson
    Participant

    Thanks for the fabulous summary of key points from the launch event. I had to attend online since I am located in Boise, Idaho, USA. (I’m an Associate Professor in Educational Technology at Boise State.) Thank you so much for streaming the sessions and posting recordings on the YouTube channel. I wasn’t able to catch all of the streams, but watched everything posted on YouTube. 

    Two of the points raised during the sessions and in the blog post were ethics and sampling. With respect to ethics, I appreciated the discussion about public versus semi-private data that was raised by Farida Vis. My own research is centered on YouTube, so her talk about YouTube APIs capturing data not visible on public channels was fascinating. My current study is on school-related vlogs and I am very hesitant to share YouTube user names or links to videos included in my study. It does not matter that these data are all public. It still feels wrong to share that information. 

    With respect to sampling, this has been a problem that I have not yet resolved. In qualitative research we might apply the idea of “saturation” to social media sampling, but how do we really know when we have enough data to ensure that nothing new will contribute further to the study? It would be grand to resolve this question. 

    Anyway, thanks for the great opportunity to collaborate. I am delighted to be able to participate at a distance. 

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