Roy Williams

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  • #5379
    Roy Williams
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    And … via a rather strange but very interesting route, I ended up writing a new paper on affordances. Its based on affordances for learning, but its applied to political violence and terrorism.

    Sounds a bit odd? Not at all, really. It explores the affordances for learning in the ‘underground’ context of political violence, but the basic tenets of affordances theory, and ecological psychology apply just the same.

    It’s a chapter in a new book: Terrorism and Affordance, Continuum Press. The chapter is: “Affordances and the New Political Ecology”, and can be accessed on the University of Portsmouth website, here: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/9343/

    #5380
    Roy Williams
    Member

    Ioan, at last a response to your question!

     

    Exactly.  In principle, there is a continuing relationship between affordances and uses (a dialectic). In a response elsewhere I put in a link to some initial work on a new paper (forthcoming this year),which starts to address that.  In my work on knowledge management I am very keen to map out the (similar) relationship between tacit and explicit knowledge, and particulary the loop back from explicit to tacit, which is where new idea become both stable and routine. 

    #4126
    Roy Williams
    Member

    Olga, exactly.

    And because the self/story teller is part of the story, there is a different dynamic, or balance of power, of authority – the researcher makes sense of the narrator’s sensemaking, which in some ways makes the researcher a ‘secondary’ researcher, no?

    #4427
    Roy Williams
    Member

    Hi, it depends what you want to do, and what you mean by exploring the story and the meaning of the story.

    In our work on Nested Narratives we use a variant of Tom Wengraf’s BNIM. What is key for us is to enable people to make sense of their own stories, learning, identity. So we use the first part of BNIM, and then enable the story teller to add associations – pictures, texts, etc.

    But what we are doing is essentially turning the narrator into a researcher of their own learning and identity, which we then observe, as ‘secondary researchers’ if you like.

    What do you want to get out of the ‘meaning of the story’?

    #4660
    Roy Williams
    Member

    Hi Kerry, haven’t read it yet 🙁

    The Nested Narratives that we do is specifically designed to enable exploration of tacit knowledge and understanding, and yields very rich stories about the interaction between learning and identity. May be of interest. There is a link to a methodology paper here.

    #5292
    Roy Williams
    Member

    Rob, good go meet a Pompey graduate!

    There is lots that can be done in terms of analysis, but I think it depends on what you are looking for in the first place, and how you set up your ‘interviews’ – we wanted to step back from prejudging the way people were going about their business (which happened to be HE learning in a professional part-time context), so our ‘interviewing’ is much more like facilitating, and not like ‘structured interviewing’ at all.

    What is the problem or issue that you are curious about in the first place?

    Roy

    #5295
    Roy Williams
    Member

    Hi Rob, you might find this useful (http://learning-affordances.wikispaces.com/Project+Report – see figure 1 and 2 on page 19 and 20 of the Report.

    I asked quite open ended questions about learning, and got responses about learning and professional identity. I then had to find a way to analyse these in terms of the strategic responses the interviewees were making in a highly complex learning and social ‘ecology’. So I drew on ecological psychology (for ‘affordances’) and on complexity theory (for an analysis of unpredictable, but yet retrospectively coherent events).

    #5381
    Roy Williams
    Member

    Sure. Affordances are created by the interaction between the user and the environment. This is definitely more dynamic in the ‘learning’ phase, and generally consolidates in the ‘operational’ phase. In a community, you can stabilise affordances, but you would (as in any good operational phase) review them from time to time. In other words, the process of creating and stabilising affordances is likely to be iterative.

    For example: I ran a project management wiki, in which we needed to track several related processes in parallel.

    One of the team created an affordance, i.e. a way to blog more than one issue in parallel blogs, on the same page. She set it up, tried it out, the rest of us tried it out, and we then decided to use the ‘muli-blog’ format in the wiki, for tracking these related processes, instead of using either multiple separate blogs (in blogs) or multiple separate pages in the wiki.

    The wiki-and-blog environment provided potential affordances for using more than one blog for project management. However, it was too cumbersome to use what was immediately available, so someone created an amalgamation of functions, and created a multi-blog ‘page’ in a wiki.

    (It appears and functions as a multi-blog, but you actually set if up on more than one wiki page).

    An amalgamation, or mashup, of existing functions to create a new function is a good example of affordances.

    #5712
    Roy Williams
    Member

    Rosemary, agreed. Here is an example of an introductory chapter written some time ago about critical discourse analysis, and its application to Apartheid discourse and media (see the Text and Discourse Word link at the bottom of the page).

    Ironically enough, the key ‘worked examples’ focus on different ways of ‘counting’ in media headlines.

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