Quantitative Skills conference 26th March 2012

On Monday, I attended an excellent conference at the British Academy on Quantitative Skills, with a focus on international comparisons. The main question posed by the conference was, ‘How well trained are UK social science students in quantitative skills?’ The resounding answer was ‘Not very well’! The conference examined some of the reasons for this, […]

Categories: Qualitative

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Qualitative content analysis – the nuts and bolts…

I write about qualitative content analysis, I teach qualitative content analysis, I supervise work using qualitative content analysis – and I have many students approach me with the problems they run into when using the method. So why not – blog about qualitative content analysis as well? And what better place to do so than […]

Categories: Qualitative

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TwitterPanic, NHST, Wizards, and the Cult of Significance Again

****Warning, some bad language used: don’t read if you’re offended by that sort of thing**** I haven’t done a blog in a while, so I figured I ought to. Having joined Twitter a while back, I now find myself suffering from TwitterPanic™, which is an anxiety disorder (I fully anticipate to be part of DSM-V) […]

Categories: MentorSpace, Quantitative

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New Realities toolkit: Using diaries in research with people with dementia

We’ve added a new Realities toolkit to our website: Using diaries in research with people with dementia by Ruth Bartlett at University of Southampton. It describes her research which used written, photo and oral diaries in participatory research with people with dementia. A great introduction to the practical side of using this approach in your research! http://www.manchester.ac.uk/morgancentre/realities/toolkits/diary/

Categories: Qualitative

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Two common (and recent) mistakes about dual process reasoning and cognitive bias

“Dual process” theories of reasoning — which have been around for a long time in social psychology — posit (for the sake of forming and testing hypotheses; positing for any other purpose is obnoxious) that there is an important distinction between two types of mental operations. Very generally, one of these involves largely unconscious, intuitive reasoning […]

Categories: Quantitative

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Against Goldilocks “Theorizing” (on Climate Change Risk Perception & Anything Else)

We often are told that “dire news” on climate change provokes dissonance-driven resistance. Yet many commentators who credit  this account also warn us not to raise public hopes by even engaging in research on — much less discussion of — the feasibility of geoengeineering. These analysts worry that any intimation that there’s a technological “fix” for global warming will lull […]

Categories: Quantitative

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Industrial Strength Risk Perception Measure

In an earlier post, I presented some data that displayed how public perceptions of risk vary across putative hazards and how perceptions of each of those risks varies between cultural subgroups.     The risk perceptions were measured by asking respondents to indicate on “a scale of 0-10 with 0 being ‘no risk at all’ and 10 meaning ‘extreme risk,’ […]

Categories: Quantitative

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Methods Term of the Week… Delphi technique

Delphi technique “A predictive method for obtaining consensus among a group of experts often used as a means of problem solving, decision making and/or forecasting.” For more information on this term or thousands of others, visit SAGE Research Methods, a highly practical tool that links over 100,000 pages of SAGE’s book, journal and reference content with […]

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