Why You Probably Need More Imputations Than You Think

Over the last decade, multiple imputation has rapidly become one of the most widely-used methods for handling missing data. However, one of the big uncertainties about the practice of multiple imputation is how many imputed data sets are needed to get good results. In this post, I’ll summarize what I know about this issue. Bottom […]

Categories: Big Data

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Designing for Emergence in Focus groups

Designing for Emergence in Focus Groups        One of the most common pieces of advice in introductions to qualitative research is the need to alternate between data collection and data analysis. The common metaphor here is a cyclical rather than a linear process. Another name for this strategy is emergent design, where the original […]

Categories: Qualitative

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Call for papers, Section: Social Indicators (UFPel – Brazil) – Petición de ponencias

CALL FOR PAPERS =============== 3rd International Meeting of Social Sciences:Crisis and the emergence of new social dynamicsOctober, 8 – 11, 2012. Universidade Federal de Pelotas – UFPelInstituto de Sociologia e Política – ISPPrograma de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Sociais – PPGCS3eicsufpel@gmail.com Pelotas city,  State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazilhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pelotas SECTION 10 – SOCIAL INDICATORS (Coord.) […]

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Bonferroni Correcting Lots of Correlations

omeone posed me this question: Some of my research, if not all of it (:-S) will use multiple correlations. I’m now only considering those correlations that are less than .001. However, having looked at bonferroni corrections today – testing 49 correlations require an alpha level of something lower than 0.001. So essentially meaning that correlations […]

Categories: Big Data, MentorSpace, Quantitative

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SPSS is not dead

This blog was published recently showing that the use of R continues to grow in academia. One of the graphs (Figure 1) showed citations (using google scholar) of different statistical packages in academic papers (to which I have added annotations). Figure 1: Citations of stats packages (from http://blog.revolutionanalytics.com/2012/04/rs-continued-growth-in-academia.html)   At face value, this graph implies […]

Categories: Big Data, Quantitative

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