Write with Purpose, Publish for Impact

Categories: Careers, Getting published, Impact, MentorSpace, Presenting, Students, Teaching, Tools and Resources, Writing

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When we put our thoughts into writing and publish them, we tell the world something about who we are. We move beyond circles of people who know us — colleagues and friends– to reach readers we will never meet. They learn about us from the choices reflected in our writing. What messages do you want to convey to your readers?

Attentive readers learn something about our priorities and the values we consider to be important—for our respective fields and the world at large. What questions do we ask in our research, and whose voices do we bring forward? To what extent do we focus on the same questions over multiple studies and publications, digging deeper and building new knowledge in a specific disciplinary area? And to what extent do we stretch and change, asking new questions and looking to connect proverbial dots across disciplines and sectors?

As the publication list grows, readers can discern our publication strategy by looking at the types of work we generate. Do we focus on results, or methods and process? Do we build a list of articles published exclusively in scholarly journals or books? Does our publication list include practical how-to guides, manuals, or other types of work that offer guidance for applying what we have learned in improved policies or practices? Do our outputs include podcasts, media, visualizations or visual representations, comics, or other materials that might creatively present research findings?

Think about the messages you want to convey with your published writings. Publications can help open new doors and build new networks— so it is important to think about which doors and networks you hope to discover. This collection, originally posted on SAGE MethodSpace and the Textbook and Academic Authors Association blog Abstract, can help you reflect on the best options and move forward. The material is organized to correspond to writing stages:

  • Imagining the Writing Project
  • Organizing and Planning the Process
  • Focusing and Being Productive
  • Sharing Work in Progress
  • Publishing & Presenting

Use them to develop the writings and publications that reach your desired audience, and create the impact you hope to achieve.

Imagining the Writing Project

Academic Writing: Counting Words or Meaning?

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What Do We Write to Convey?

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Academic ≠ Boring: Presenting Your Research

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Renew, Refresh, Reboot, Restart Your Academic Writing

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Keeping Writing Projects Alive

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How to Revive Academic Writing Left for Dead

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How to Get Your Journal Article Published

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Organizing and Planning the Process

Writing for Readers

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Make Sense to Your Reader with Improved Organization

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Tools for Academic Writers

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Resources for Organizing Your Writing Projects

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Getting Started with a New (or Revived) Writing Project

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Pedagogy of Book and Chapter Organization

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Using Visuals to Support Your Writing Process

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Focusing and Being Productive

Focusing: The Muse and the Mundane

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Becoming a Productive Academic Writer

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Six Academic Writing Habits That Boost Productivity

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Co-Authoring & Writing Collaboration: Planning Strategies for Success

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Tips for Co-Writing a Book

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Making Sense of The Knowledge Explosion with Knowledge Mapping

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Envisioning an Edited Book

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Proposing an Edited Book

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Editors’ Roles: Relating to Contributors

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Editors’ Roles: Selecting Book Chapters

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Sharing Work in Progress

Sharing Work, Inviting Input

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Share Your Research on a Blog

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Share Research Visually

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Share Academic Work on Social Media

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Publishing & Presenting

Research > Publication > Impact (You Might Need a Strategy for That)

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Develop Your Voice as an Academic Writer

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Can Writers be Social Online?

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Social Media or Blog? New Dilemmas for Academics & Writers

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