Big Data and Social Research Roundup No. 9

In this edition of SAGE Publishing’s monthly newsletter for computational social scientists, the issue takes a page from MethodSpace itself and looks at how social network analysis is changing in a big data era in a recent interview with Song Yang, lead author of the new text Social Network Analysis: Methods and Examples. In addition […]

Categories: Big Data, SAGE Posts, Tools and Resources

Tags:

Continue Reading

There’s a Guerrilla Movement to Protect Data

This probably isn’t how you envisioned a guerrilla movement … A snapshot from the data rescue workshop, “Protecting Climate Data in Times of Political Turmoil,” held at UCLA on Jan. 20. (Photo: Jennifer Pierre) On the United States’ Inauguration Day, a group of students, researchers and librarians gathered in a nondescript building on the north […]

Categories: Big Data, Editorial

Tags:

Continue Reading

Reimagining Ancillary Materials for Texts and Academic Books

This post complements Janet’s webinar, Texts Plus: Ancillary Materials & Companion Sites, for the Textbook and Academic Authors Association on April 24.  When we write a book for instructional purposes, completing the manuscript is only one step of the process. We also need to develop materials that instructors and students can use to teach and […]

Categories: Teaching, Tools and Resources, Uncategorised

Tags: ,

Continue Reading

The Methodology of Inequality: A Chat with Samuel Myers Jr.

What we know and what we can prove are often quite separate, as any good researcher (or lawyer) will testify. Understanding that, Samuel L. Myers, Jr., has spent his career as both an academic and an advocate bridging that particular chasm, pioneering econometric methods to first study areas like law enforcement, housing, government aid and […]

Categories: Quantitative

Tags:

Continue Reading

New Public Data Lab’s First Output: Field Guide to Fake News

A new “Public Data Lab” at the Institute for Policy Research at the University of Bath has produced its first fruit, A Field Guide to Fake News, which harnesses digital methods “to trace the production, circulation and reception of fake news online.” The use of digital methods, the guide observes, is not just sufficient but […]

Categories: Big Data, Tools and Resources

Tags: , ,

Continue Reading

Book Review – Engaged Urbanism: Cities and Methodologies

Engaged Urbanism: Cities and Methodologies. Ben Campkin and Ger Duijzings (eds). IB Tauris. 2016. Engaged Urbanism: Cities and Methodologies is an imaginative foray into rethinking how scholars approach the city and challenging assumptions around urban research. It mirrors recent academic debate seeking to innovate in contemporary university conditions and attempts to make social research more “crafty” […]

Categories: Mixed

Tags: , ,

Continue Reading

Paradoxes of Probability and Other Statistical Strangeness

Statistics is a useful tool for understanding the patterns in the world around us. But our intuition often lets us down when it comes to interpreting those patterns. In this series we look at some of the common mistakes we make and how to avoid them when thinking about statistics, probability and risk. You don’t […]

Categories: Quantitative, Tools and Resources

Tags: , ,

Continue Reading

Crowdsourcing Raises Host of Methodological and Ethical Questions

Crowdsourcing offers researchers ready access to large numbers of participants, while enabling the processing of huge, unique datasets. However, the power of crowdsourcing raises several issues, including whether or not what initially emerged as a business practice can be transformed into a sound research method. Isabell Stamm and Lina Eklund argue that the complexities of managing large numbers of people mean crowdsourcing reduces participants to one faceless crowd. Applied to research, this is inherently problematic as it contradicts the basic idea that we control who participates in our studies. This not only challenges scientific rules of representativeness but also leaves methodological designs vulnerable to researchers’ implicit assumptions about the crowd.

Categories: Big Data, Editorial

Tags: ,

Continue Reading

Coping with Data Visualization’s Many Options

The late data visionary Hans Rosling mesmerized the world with his work, contributing to a more informed society. Rosling used global health data to paint a stunning picture of how our world is a better place now than it was in the past, bringing hope through data. Now more than ever, data are collected from […]

Categories: Big Data, Quantitative, Tools and Resources

Tags:

Continue Reading

Video: Running Focus Groups

Focus groups are a form of qualitative research in which the researcher generates the data through an open, but directed, discussion with a small group of participants. In this video – which you can watch for free by clicking here —  qualitative researcher Carol McNaughton Nicholls discusses but the behind-the-scenes aspects of running a focus […]

Categories: Qualitative, Tools and Resources, Video

Tags:

Continue Reading